Greece

I do not know what I expected when I decided to visit Greece, but I know I was not expecting the breathtaking views and monumental sites that I saw.

I arrived late at night, like I have for most of my trips, and did some late night exploring. Mostly I was on the hunt for food. I found a cheap gyro shop and discovered I am not a fan of eating lamb. I also discovered that either I had no clue how to eat the massive sandwhich or it was meant to be really messy.

Gyro
On my first full day in Athens, I visited the Acropolis and the surrounding areas. I was a little upset that there was construction on the famous side of the Parthenon, but I got over it considering how much there is to see. Besides the Parthenon, the Acropolis includes temples to Athena and Artemis, the Erechtheion, the theatre of Dionysus and the Odeon of Herodes Atticus. Oh, and plenty of cats! The surrounding area includes the Agorra, which was a market place in ancient times, a modern market place selling souvenirs and a rock to climb for views of both the Acropolis and Athens.

Nice view above the Odeon
The Parthenon at the Acropolis
I took a day cruise to three of the Saronic islands, the islands closest to Athens, on the next day. The ones I visited are Hydra, Poros and Aegina. On the boat, I met a girl named Michelle who became my buddy while exploring the islands. 

Hydra was by far the prettiest of the three islands. We just explored the town and enjoyed the views of the Mediterranean Sea, but that was all we really needed to do to know how majestic the island is. We saw a lot more cats, too. One came up to me and started rubbing against my leg and then followed us for a little while. The cats are really friendly and well cared for. There are even cat stations around that have food and blankets for them. On the top of a hill, we came face to face with a donkey and some chickens. The donkey was asleep at first, but once we got closer to the chickens he woke up and looked really defensive.

Hydra

Poros was similar to Hydra, but smaller. We went to a clock tower and saw some nice views, then bought some baklava and ate it by the sea.

Poros
Aegina is the largest of the three islands we visited. We went to a monestary and bought some pistachios, which Aegina is known for. We visited the Temple of Apollo at sunset, which was a really nice sight. On the boat ride back, we enjoyed traditional Greek dancing and even learned a few dances ourselves.

Temple of Apollo
After watching the sunrise on the rock near the Acropolis, I took a day trip to Delphi, where the Oracle of Apollo was. The tour guide was the nicest and most knowledgeable I have had yet; she was really sweet. We visited a museum and the Sanctuary of Apollo, which includes the Oracle, a treasury and the Theatre of Apollo. 

Sunrise over Athens
Oracle of Delphi in the background

It was really snowy and icy the day that I went, so the tour guide said the theatre might be closed. But to my delight, it was open and I got to stand on the stage that actors performed on millennias ago; unlike the Odeon and Theatre of Dionysus at the Acropolis, which could only be looked at. On the way to the theatre, a cat with one pupil bigger than the other approached me and meowed at me while standing on his hind legs. I tried to move, but he moved to block my path again. I am still unsure why he took such interest in me.

Theatre of Apollo

We took a short stop in a little town nearby and had a four course lunch at a quaint restaurant. The lunch was delicious, but difficult to finish because most of us were full by the end of the second course.

I visited the Archeological Museum and Acropolis Museum on my last day in Athens, and watched the changing of the guards at Syntagma Square with Michelle. Both museums were filled with unbelievably well preserved ancient finds. The changing of the gaurds was interesting because of how the gaurds kicked their legs and flicked their ankles before each step like a dance.

Changing of the Gaurds
Up next: Germany and my final days in England.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s